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Mela Phulkari II 1469

Group Exhibition of Punjab and Phulkari – art installations, ceramics, jute, metal

The exhibition Mela Phulkari, presented by 1469 and curated by Alka Pande, was aimed at reviving the artform of phulkari and bringing in a fresh whiff of all pretty and popular things from Punjab. Phulkari, the popular embroidery technique of Punjab is not only a well-appreciated textile craft, but also a happy blend of colours and culture. The exhibition became a platform where on display werecolourful pakhis (hand fans), madanis (butter churner), tillajutis (footwear), Manja (village cots), parandis (the festive hair accessory), and not to forget the rich textiles and embroideries.The feast for the eyes paved way for ears too. Visitors were greeted by traditional musical instruments such as sarangi, nagada, dilruba, and dhadd. The concept was aimed at serenading urban Delhites and pampering their senses. The event saw a revival of art, craft, and culture in the feistiest form. The exhibition presented over 150 year old phulkaris, some of which belongs to the brand 1469, while a few were borrowed from the personal collections of royal families for public viewing. The ‘Mela Phulkari’ became the iconic image of the cultural identity of the state. The novel concept not only offered economic independence to the women-power, but also provided financial aid to the widows who were victims of farmer suicides in Punjab. 1469 is actively developing centres in various belts of the city to promote and popularize the art of phulkari. Phulkari is a metaphor that represents not just as a textile on which the women of Punjab embroider their dreams and their lives, but a leitmotif that represents the complex web with which the crafts and culture of the land are enmeshed.

Group Exhibition of Punjab and Phulkari – art installations, ceramics, jute, metal
1st April – 8th April 2015, Open Palm Court Gallery, India Habitat Centre
Curated by
Dr. Alka Pande

Beyond the Village Pond (10)1
Beyond the Village Pond (1)
Beyond the Village Pond (2)
Beyond the Village Pond (6)
Beyond the Village Pond (4)
Beyond the Village Pond (3)
Beyond the Village Pond (5)
Beyond the Village Pond (7)

Beyond the Village Pond

Reflections on the Culture of Punjab
Shivdev Singh

I met Shivdev Singh in the winter of 1997, almost eighteen years ago, in Chandigarh, when I was right in the midst of completing my manuscript on the folk music and instruments of Punjab. Perhaps it was serendipity, because Shivdev and I have shared a wonderful trajectory on Punjab ever since.
The journey continues as Shivdev holds his fourth solo exhibition at the Visual Arts Galllery, India Habitat Centre, New Delhi in the beginning of the autumn of 2015.

Curated by
Dr. Alka Pande

Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (4)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (1)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (2)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (3)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (5)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (6)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (7)
Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha- (8)

Crossing the Lakshmana Rekha

Shakti| Sensuality | Sexuality
Katharina Kakar

Like our economic and political worlds, stories too are defined by the principle of nkali ( to be greater than another). How they are told, who tells them, when they told, how many stories are told, are really dependent on power.” Chimamanda Adiche Katharina Kakar is telling multiple stories about women, some personal, some textual, some experiential and some mythical. They all emerge from her own private sense of India, an India she has lived and experienced for the last twenty years as a writer, as a n academic, centering around the ideas of comparative religion, and as an educator through here Tara Trust. Born in Germany, Katharina earned her Master in Comparative Religion, Anthropology and Indian Art from the Free University, Berlin and took her Ph.D. in 2001. In 2012 that she made her debut in the world of Visual Arts in India.

Curated by

Dr. Alka Pande

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The moving finger writes and having writ moves on,
Nor all thy piety nor wit,
shall lure it back to cancel half a line,
Nor all thy tears wash a word of it.

Calligraphy has been used in many ancient cultures through the ages emerging from Islamic thought. It was used extensively as an ornamental device in Islamic architecture as well as in the illustration of Bibles in early Christian Byzantine art. While it is said to have originated with the Sumerians, Persia, Japan, China, India, Nepal, Korea, Tibet and the whole East Asia had a long and flourishing calligraphic tradition. Wang Xizhi, a great Chinese calligrapher was even dubbed the ‘Sage of Calligraphy’. Ono no Michikaze, Fujiwara no Sukemasa and Fujiwara no Yukinari hailed from Japan and were popularly heralded as the ‘skin,flesh and bones’ of Japanese calligraphy, The Kashgar Lotus Sutra is a famous example of a Buddhist manuscript dating back to the middle of the first millennium AD which bears a striking similarity to large lettered Chinese calligraphy, The art form travelled with the sultans to India where it was incorporated into miniatures, finding special importance under the reign of Shah Jahan, The Taj Mahal being the most widely known example of Islamic calligraphy used as an architectural element and verses from the Quran cover the walls of the Jama Masjid.

Curated by

Dr. Alka Pande